Isaias Now Back Up to Hurricane Status, Just a Few Hours Away from Landfall

SUMMARY OF 800 PM EDT…0000 UTC…INFORMATION

LOCATION…32.8N 79.0W
ABOUT 60 MI…100 KM E OF CHARLESTON SOUTH CAROLINA
ABOUT 60 MI…100 KM S OF MYRTLE BEACH SOUTH CAROLINA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…75 MPH…120 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNE OR 15 DEGREES AT 16 MPH…26 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…988 MB…29.18 INCHES


SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for…
* Folly Beach South Carolina to Cape Fear North Carolina
* Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds, including the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers
* Oregon Inlet North Carolina to the North Carolina/Virginia border

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for…
* Cape Fear to Oregon Inlet North Carolina

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for…
* South Santee River South Carolina to Surf City North Carolina

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for…
* Edisto Beach South Carolina to South Santee River South Carolina
* North of Surf City North Carolina to Stonington Maine
* Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds
* Chesapeake Bay
* Tidal Potomac River
* Delaware Bay
* Long Island and Long Island Sound
* Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, and Block Island

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for…
* North of Stonington to Eastport Maine


DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK

At 800 PM EDT (0000 UTC), the center of Hurricane Isaias was located by NOAA Doppler weather radars and an Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft near latitude 32.8 North, longitude 79.0 West. Isaias is moving toward the north-northeast near 16 mph (26 km/h), and this general motion accompanied by a gradual increase in forward speed is expected through tonight followed by a further increase in the forward speed on Tuesday. On the forecast track, the center of Isaias will approach the coasts of northeastern South Carolina and southern North Carolina within the hurricane warning area during the next few hours. The center will then move inland across eastern North Carolina early Tuesday morning, move along the coast of the mid-Atlantic states on Tuesday, and continue across the northeastern United States Tuesday night.

Data from NOAA Doppler weather radars and the Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that maximum sustained winds have increased to near 75 mph (120 km/h) with higher gusts. Some additional strengthening is possible before landfall. After landfall, only gradual weakening is anticipated after Isaias makes landfall in the Carolinas and moves across the U.S. mid-Atlantic region tonight and Tuesday.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles (205 km) from the center. NOAA buoy 41004 recently reported sustained winds of 60 mph (96 km/h), and sustained tropical-storm-force winds have been reported along the South Carolina coast between Charleston and Georgetown.

The minimum central pressure based on aircraft and buoy data is 988 MB (29.18 inches). NOAA buoy 41004 recently reported a minimum pressure of 988.9 MB (29.20 inches).


KEY MESSAGES

1. There is the danger of life-threatening storm surge inundation along portions of the immediate coastline and adjacent waterways of northeastern South Carolina and the North Carolina coast, including portions of Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. Residents in these areas should follow the advice given by local emergency officials.

2. Isaias is expected to be at or near hurricane strength when it reaches the coast of northeastern South Carolina and southern North Carolina in a few hours, and hurricane conditions are expected in the Hurricane Warning area this evening.

3. Isaias is expected to bring widespread sustained tropical-storm-force winds and wind gusts to hurricane force to the mid-Atlantic coast, including portions of the Chesapeake Bay region, on Tuesday, which could cause tree damage and power outages. Tropical storm conditions are expected to spread across New England late Tuesday into early Wednesday.

4. Heavy rainfall along the East Coast near the path of Isaias will result in flash and urban flooding, some of which may be significant in the eastern Carolinas, mid-Atlantic, and northeast through Wednesday. Widespread minor to moderate river flooding is possible across portions of the Carolinas and the Mid-Atlantic. Quick-responding rivers in the northeast will also be susceptible to minor river flooding.

All information from the National Hurricane Center’s 7:00 pm CDT Update.


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